wittyandcharming:

THESE PARENT BIRDS ARE SO BEAUTIFUL LIKE BIRDY DRAG QUEENS WITH FLAWLESS EYELINER AND THE BABY LOOKS LIKE AN UNFINISHED MUPPET AND I’M DEAD.

tagged: #to do

wickedclothes:

Solar System Necklace

Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and Pluto are all included in this solar system necklace. Don’t hold the whole world in your hands. Hold the entire solar system around your neck. Hung on an 18” chain. Sold on Etsy.

tagged: #to do

oswhin:

it is my greatest wish to time travel to the future and watch historically inaccurate period dramas about the early 2000s

enoshima-junko:

askayallqu:

Isn’t this that daft punk song

regular softer harder porridge is my favourite daft punk song

tagged: #snails

tundrasretreat:

bulqarian:

7rn:

sweet-bitsy:

Snails Kiss On Cherries [photo by Vyacheslav Mishchenk]

THIS IS EVERYTHING I WANT MY LIFE TO BE

these snails are actually having sex. the snails reproductive system is near the front of their body and although each snail has both the male and female reproductive organs, self fertilization is rare. congrats on the snail porn

very nsfw

This is the cutest porn I’ve ever seen

(Source: bedabug)

tagged: #advice #writing
Writing Advice: by Chuck Palahniuk

In six seconds, you’ll hate me.
But in six months, you’ll be a better writer.

From this point forward—at least for the next half year—you may not use “thought” verbs. These include: Thinks, Knows, Understands, Realizes, Believes, Wants, Remembers, Imagines, Desires, and a hundred others you love to use.

The list should also include: Loves and Hates.
And it should include: Is and Has, but we’ll get to those later.

Until some time around Christmas, you can’t write: Kenny wondered if Monica didn’t like him going out at night…”

Instead, you’ll have to Un-pack that to something like: “The
mornings after Kenny had stayed out, beyond the last bus, until he’d had to bum a ride or pay for a cab and got home to find Monica faking sleep, faking because she never slept that quiet, those mornings, she’d only put her own cup of coffee in the microwave. Never his.”

Instead of characters knowing anything, you must now present the details that allow the reader to know them. Instead of a character wanting something, you must now describe the thing so that the reader wants it.

Instead of saying: “Adam knew Gwen liked him.” You’ll have to say: “Between classes, Gwen had always leaned on his locker when he’d go to open it. She’s roll her eyes and shove off with one foot, leaving a black-heel mark on the painted metal, but she also left the smell of her perfume. The combination lock would still be warm from her butt. And the next break, Gwen would be leaned there, again.”

In short, no more short-cuts. Only specific sensory detail: action, smell, taste, sound, and feeling.

Typically, writers use these “thought” verbs at the beginning of a paragraph (In this form, you can call them “Thesis Statements” and I’ll rail against those, later). In a way, they state the intention of the paragraph. And what follows, illustrates them.

For example:
“Brenda knew she’d never make the deadline. was backed up from the bridge, past the first eight or nine exits. Her cell phone battery was dead. At home, the dogs would need to go out, or there would be a mess to clean up. Plus, she’d promised to water the plants for her neighbor…”

Do you see how the opening “thesis statement” steals the thunder of what follows? Don’t do it.

If nothing else, cut the opening sentence and place it after all the others. Better yet, transplant it and change it to: Brenda would never make the deadline.

Thinking is abstract. Knowing and believing are intangible. Your story will always be stronger if you just show the physical actions and details of your characters and allow your reader to do the thinking and knowing. And loving and hating.

Don’t tell your reader: “Lisa hated Tom.”

Instead, make your case like a lawyer in court, detail by detail.

Present each piece of evidence. For example: “During roll call, in the breath after the teacher said Tom’s name, in that moment before he could answer, right then, Lisa would whisper-shout ‘Butt Wipe,’ just as Tom was saying, ‘Here’.”

One of the most-common mistakes that beginning writers make is leaving their characters alone. Writing, you may be alone. Reading, your audience may be alone. But your character should spend very, very little time alone. Because a solitary character starts thinking or worrying or wondering.

For example: Waiting for the bus, Mark started to worry about how long the trip would take…”

A better break-down might be: “The schedule said the bus would come by at noon, but Mark’s watch said it was already 11:57. You could see all the way down the road, as far as the Mall, and not see a bus. No doubt, the driver was parked at the turn-around, the far end of the line, taking a nap. The driver was kicked back, asleep, and Mark was going to be late. Or worse, the driver was drinking, and he’d pull up drunk and charge Mark seventy-five cents for death in a fiery traffic accident…”

A character alone must lapse into fantasy or memory, but even then you can’t use “thought” verbs or any of their abstract relatives.

Oh, and you can just forget about using the verbs forget and remember.

No more transitions such as: “Wanda remembered how Nelson used to brush her hair.”

Instead: “Back in their sophomore year, Nelson used to brush her hair with smooth, long strokes of his hand.”

Again, Un-pack. Don’t take short-cuts.

Better yet, get your character with another character, fast.
Get them together and get the action started. Let their actions and words show their thoughts. You—stay out of their heads.

And while you’re avoiding “thought” verbs, be very wary about using the bland verbs “is” and “have.”

For example:
“Ann’s eyes are blue.”

“Ann has blue eyes.”

Versus:

“Ann coughed and waved one hand past her face, clearing the cigarette smoke from her eyes, blue eyes, before she smiled…”

Instead of bland “is” and “has” statements, try burying your details of what a character has or is, in actions or gestures. At its most basic, this is showing your story instead of telling it.

And forever after, once you’ve learned to Un-pack your characters, you’ll hate the lazy writer who settles for: “Jim sat beside the telephone, wondering why Amanda didn’t call.”

Please. For now, hate me all you want, but don’t use thought verbs. After Christmas, go crazy, but I’d bet money you won’t.

(…)

For this month’s homework, pick through your writing and circle every “thought” verb. Then, find some way to eliminate it. Kill it by Un-packing it.

Then, pick through some published fiction and do the same thing. Be ruthless.

“Marty imagined fish, jumping in the moonlight…”

“Nancy recalled the way the wine tasted…”

“Larry knew he was a dead man…”

Find them. After that, find a way to re-write them. Make them stronger.

tagged: #advice #to do
The messages you received from your family or your childhood experiences may have caused you to believe that assertiveness is unacceptable or even dangerous. Practice saying the following: I have the right to be treated with respect by others. I have the right to express my feelings and opinions. I have the right to say no without feeling guilty. I have the right to ask for what I want. I have the right to make my own mistakes. I have the right to pursue happiness.
Nice Girl Syndrome by Beverly Engel (via speakoutbeheard)
tagged: #photography #art

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Ksenia Tolmacheva's fairy tale photography

It’s no secret that Russia is home to some of the world’s most beautiful women, and photographer Ksenia Tolmacheva wanted to stand out among the many photographers in Moscow who take photos of models and brides at weddings, so this year she took on an ambitious photo project to portray a world of magic and fairy tales in order to promote her work. Her web site is: http://www.muza.pro

tagged: #actual tears

d-a-t-t-e-b-a-y-o-o:

lafaiette:

woahitsjuan:

among-the-spheres:

catch7:

image

i will reblog this everytime it is on my dashboard. 

image

Oh God ;A;

I’m dying

tagged: #costume #cosplay

cross-race-cosplay:

dontbearuiner:

zohbugg:

My Muslim friend’s Princess Leia Costume

via imgur

BRILLIANT PERFECTION

NAILED IT.

omg omg WONDERFUL

(Source: muslimwomeninhistory)

tagged: #to do
how to make a head wreath

in-aporia:

piefacedfeminist:

4-girls-only:

image

DAAAAMN I GOTTTA TRY THIS SOMETIME

I wants to do this..

cumbercrieff:

Benedict Cumberbatch as Alan Turing filming The Imitation Game September 18, 2013. [x]

tagged: #to do #pranks

trevenant:

pleatedjeans:

This is How You Prank Someone.

THE LAST ONE OH MY GOD

tagged: #costume #cosplay

(Source: eclectic69)